© District 3 RTO/ERO Legal Notice Human Rights Statement
Our Telephone Team is indispensible!

Committees

District 3 - Current Events

2017 Fall Senate - Resolutions Passed

Bill 21- An Act to Regulate Retirement Homes

Health & Wind Turbines (Political Advocacy)

A Misuse of Public Funds (Political Advocacy)

"Wind Turbines in Algoma" -- Visit SOAR (Save Ontario’s Algoma Region)

RTO/ERO Provincial Report on CETA

Responses to CETA from the Prime Minister and Provincial Premiers

(Canada & EU Free Trade)

RTO/ERO Report for the Telephone Committee

Hope everyone had a great summer! Thank you to all members who

will continue to be part of this important committee! Special welcome

to new members Patricia and George Pateman and Marion and Bruce

Avery. Also, welcome to Barbara Jarvis who will take over the reins

from Linda Lola as our representative in Wawa. Please remember to

let your caller know when you will attend a meeting and if you are

bringing a guest. If your friend received a call, they should report their

wish to attend to their caller, that way we will not be counting members

twice. Our attendance number needs to be as accurate as possible

for seating arrangement and food preparation. Looking forward to

seeing many of you at the Legion on Tuesday, October 16!

We thank these new members along with the rest of the Committee,

Geraldine Yeo Ruby Buck Monika Marshall Marilyn Rouleau Carmen Charsley Sandy Fulcher Mary Coulas Brenda Wilson Leone Hamilton Delmer Weber Loretta McKay Sandra Gordon Janet Morris Ida MacKinnon Diane Marshall Marg and Bob Cole Ann Blake Carol McFarlane Kathryn Greening Carol Kirkland-Boissineau Merrilyn Webb Linda Iiola Rita Wagner Moyra O’Pallie Rose-Marie Valade Jean Kniahnicki Joan Smith Maureen Gooderham Mirian Birkinshaw Bernice Whalen Blair Sterling Laurian Montgomery Judith Pratt Jean Campbell Mary Eaton Marny Pollard Carol Rossetto Alice Ward Linda MacDonald Barbara Jarvis

Thank you to all our callers!

Remember, if you can’t make a meeting, please call Carmelina

ASAP to cancel!

Carmelina Spry,

Telephone Committee Chair

Telephone Committee
Renew the Call for Improved Long-Term Care Standards In April 2018 the Retired Teachers of Ontario and the National Association of Federal Retirees (NAFR) partnered to launch an advocacy campaign to represent the concerns of members and seniors in the approach to last June’s Ontario election. This campaign was called the Vibrant Voices campaign. One of the key issues of the Vibrant Voices campaign was to take action against elder abuse. Any situation that limits or controls the rights and freedoms of an older adult is a form of elder abuse. Elder abuse includes physical abuse, but also psychological and emotional abuse. It often occurs in a senior’s own home. For many seniors home is a long-term care facility. Vibrant Voices supported the passage of Bill 33 (Time to Care Act) that would have amended the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007, mandating at least four hours a day of nursing and personal support services per resident (averaged across the residents). Unfortunately, this bill died when the election was called, leaving Ontario’s long-term care homes without a legislated minimum standard of front line resident care. Inadequate staffing in long- term care homes can lead to abuse of residents. So it was disturbing, but perhaps not surprising, to learn of the report recently released by the Ontario Health Coalition that depicts alarming conditions for residents and staff in Ontario’s long-term care homes. The report “Situation Critical: Planning, Access, Levels of Care and Violence in Ontario’s Long-Term Care” (Jan. 2019) uses statistics from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The report describes an escalating spectrum of violence in long-term care homes. It details levels of resident care that are too low to meet residents’ needs and basic safety requirements. Today’s long-term care residents often have serious complex and chronic health needs and psychological and behavioural concerns. According to the report, the percentage of residents with dementia has increased from 77 per cent in 2012-2013 to 82 percent in 2016-2017. Nearly half of long-term care residents also exhibit some form of aggressive behaviour and half of that segment exhibits severe to very severe aggression. With inadequate staffing levels there are instances of resident-on-resident abuse that are unwitnessed. There are instances where residents abuse themselves because there is not enough staff to provide prevention measures. Staff members may also abuse residents. In some cases, staff may be inadequately trained and/or too overworked to give appropriate care to each resident. The report describes shocking and intolerable levels of homicide. There were 27 homicides in Ontario’s long-term care homes, according to the Ontario Coroner in the five years leading up to the report: a homicide rate that is 4-times that of Toronto and 8-times that of communities that are similarly-sized to Ontario’s long-term care home sector (80,000 people). This number does not include the 8 deaths of residents at the hand of long-term care nurse, Elizabeth Wettlaufer. The report is critical of for-profit long-term care facilities and prefers not-for-profit because they tend to re-invest their revenue into care and the physical facility. Nearly 58 per cent of Ontario’s long-term care facilities are for profit. The report expresses concern that the Ford Government’s plan to expand long-term care services will result in more privatization. Groups that represent Ontario’s long-term care homes are asking for an end to annual inspections for all long-term care homes and reducing the regulations under which they operate. Jane Meadus, lawyer with the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly, believes the inspections are necessary for the safety and care of our vulnerable seniors and that the extra work related to these inspections is part of the trade-off to make sure long-term care residents are protected. Recent investigations by W5, Marketplace and other groups have also highlighted increasing violence in long-term care homes. This most recent report by the OHC confirms what we have known for some time - that there is a very serious and dangerous shortfall in long-term care. It is imperative that we press the Ontario government to institute a regulated minimum care standard of 4 hours of daily hands-on direct nursing and personal support to provide the necessary care and safety for every long-term care resident. Long-term care staff must be provided the training needed to deal with dementia and aggressive behaviours. It would certainly help if every home were given Behavioural Support Ontario (BSO) teams in addition to the 4 hours minimum care standard. Long–term care is an essential component of our health-care system. It is a component that is vital to the safety and quality of life of many seniors today and many of us in the future. For seniors, this is an issue that should hit home. Contact your MPP: Mike Mantha, MPP Algoma-Manitoulin Constituency Office 18 Mary Walk Elliot Lake, ON P5A 2A1 Email/Courriel: mmantha-co@ndp.on.ca Telephone/Téléphone: 705 461 9710 Toll free//Sans frais: 1-800--831-1899 Ross Romano, MPP Sault Ste. Marie Constituency Office 390 Bay Street, Suite 102 Sault Ste. Marie, ON P6A 1X2 Email/Courriel: ross.romanoco@pc.ola.org Telephone/Téléphone: 705 949 6959 -Submitted by Marie Della Vedova, Member at Large
© RTO / ERO District 3 Legal Notice Human Rights Statement

Committees

District 3 - Current Events

2017 Fall Senate - Resolutions Passed

Bill 21- An Act to Regulate Retirement Homes

Health & Wind Turbines (Political Advocacy)

A Misuse of Public Funds (Political Advocacy)

"Wind Turbines in Algoma" -- Visit SOAR (Save Ontario’s Algoma

Region)

RTO/ERO Provincial Report on CETA

Responses to CETA from the Prime Minister and Provincial Premiers

(Canada & EU Free Trade)

Telephone Committee
Our Telephone Team is indispensible!

RTO/ERO Report for the Telephone Committee

Hope everyone had a great summer! Thank you to all members

who will continue to be part of this important committee! Special

welcome to new members Patricia and George Pateman and

Marion and Bruce Avery. Also, welcome to Barbara Jarvis who will

take over the reins from Linda Lola as our representative in Wawa.

Please remember to let your caller know when you will attend a

meeting and if you are bringing a guest. If your friend received a

call, they should report their wish to attend to their caller, that way

we will not be counting members twice. Our attendance number

needs to be as accurate as possible for seating arrangement and

food preparation. Looking forward to seeing many of you at the

Legion on Tuesday, October 16!

We thank these new members along with the rest of the Committee,

Geraldine Yeo

Ruby Buck

Monika Marshall

Marilyn Rouleau

Carmen Charsley

Sandy Fulcher

Mary Coulas

Brenda Wilson

Leone Hamilton

Delmer Weber

Loretta McKay

Sandra Gordon

Janet Morris

Ida MacKinnon

Diane Marshall Marg and Bob Cole

Ann Blake

Carol McFarlane

Kathryn Greening Merrilyn Webb

Maureen Gooderham Rita Wagner

Moyra O’Pallie Rose-Marie Valade

Jean Kniahnicki

Joan Smith

Mirian Birkinshaw Bernice Whalen

Blair Sterling

Jean Campbell

Mary Eaton

Marny Pollard

Carol Rossetto

Alice Ward

Linda MacDonald Linda Liola

Judith Pratt

Carol Kirkland-Boissineau

Laurian Montgomery

Barbara Jarvis

Thank you to all our callers!

Remember, if you can’t make a meeting, please call Carmelina ASAP to

cancel!

Carmelina Spry,

Telephone Committee Chair

Renew the Call for Improved Long-Term Care Standards In April 2018 the Retired Teachers of Ontario and the National Association of Federal Retirees (NAFR) partnered to launch an advocacy campaign to represent the concerns of members and seniors in the approach to last June’s Ontario election. This campaign was called the Vibrant Voices campaign. One of the key issues of the Vibrant Voices campaign was to take action against elder abuse. Any situation that limits or controls the rights and freedoms of an older adult is a form of elder abuse. Elder abuse includes physical abuse, but also psychological and emotional abuse. It often occurs in a senior’s own home. For many seniors home is a long-term care facility. Vibrant Voices supported the passage of Bill 33 (Time to Care Act) that would have amended the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007, mandating at least four hours a day of nursing and personal support services per resident (averaged across the residents). Unfortunately, this bill died when the election was called, leaving Ontario’s long-term care homes without a legislated minimum standard of front line resident care. Inadequate staffing in long-term care homes can lead to abuse of residents. So it was disturbing, but perhaps not surprising, to learn of the report recently released by the Ontario Health Coalition that depicts alarming conditions for residents and staff in Ontario’s long-term care homes. The report “Situation Critical: Planning, Access, Levels of Care and Violence in Ontario’s Long-Term Care” (Jan. 2019) uses statistics from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care. The report describes an escalating spectrum of violence in long-term care homes. It details levels of resident care that are too low to meet residents’ needs and basic safety requirements. Today’s long-term care residents often have serious complex and chronic health needs and psychological and behavioural concerns. According to the report, the percentage of residents with dementia has increased from 77 per cent in 2012-2013 to 82 percent in 2016-2017. Nearly half of long- term care residents also exhibit some form of aggressive behaviour and half of that segment exhibits severe to very severe aggression. With inadequate staffing levels there are instances of resident-on-resident abuse that are unwitnessed. There are instances where residents abuse themselves because there is not enough staff to provide prevention measures. Staff members may also abuse residents. In some cases, staff may be inadequately trained and/or too overworked to give appropriate care to each resident. The report describes shocking and intolerable levels of homicide. There were 27 homicides in Ontario’s long-term care homes, according to the Ontario Coroner in the five years leading up to the report: a homicide rate that is 4-times that of Toronto and 8-times that of communities that are similarly-sized to Ontario’s long-term care home sector (80,000 people). This number does not include the 8 deaths of residents at the hand of long-term care nurse, Elizabeth Wettlaufer. The report is critical of for-profit long-term care facilities and prefers not- for-profit because they tend to re-invest their revenue into care and the physical facility. Nearly 58 per cent of Ontario’s long-term care facilities are for profit. The report expresses concern that the Ford Government’s plan to expand long-term care services will result in more privatization. Groups that represent Ontario’s long-term care homes are asking for an end to annual inspections for all long-term care homes and reducing the regulations under which they operate. Jane Meadus, lawyer with the Advocacy Centre for the Elderly, believes the inspections are necessary for the safety and care of our vulnerable seniors and that the extra work related to these inspections is part of the trade-off to make sure long- term care residents are protected. Recent investigations by W5, Marketplace and other groups have also highlighted increasing violence in long-term care homes. This most recent report by the OHC confirms what we have known for some time - that there is a very serious and dangerous shortfall in long-term care. It is imperative that we press the Ontario government to institute a regulated minimum care standard of 4 hours of daily hands-on direct nursing and personal support to provide the necessary care and safety for every long-term care resident. Long-term care staff must be provided the training needed to deal with dementia and aggressive behaviours. It would certainly help if every home were given Behavioural Support Ontario (BSO) teams in addition to the 4 hours minimum care standard. Long–term care is an essential component of our health-care system. It is a component that is vital to the safety and quality of life of many seniors today and many of us in the future. For seniors, this is an issue that should hit home. Contact your MPP: Mike Mantha, MPP Algoma-Manitoulin Constituency Office 18 Mary Walk Elliot Lake, ON P5A 2A1 Email/Courriel: mmantha-co@ndp.on.ca Telephone/Téléphone: 705 461 9710 Toll free//Sans frais: 1-800--831-1899 Ross Romano, MPP Sault Ste. Marie Constituency Office 390 Bay Street, Suite 102 Sault Ste. Marie, ON P6A 1X2 Email/Courriel: ross.romanoco@pc.ola.org Telephone/Téléphone: 705 949 6959 -Submitted by Marie Della Vedova, Member at Large